Women May Experience Different Heart Attack Symptoms

Women May Experience Different Heart Attack Symptoms

The importance of early recognition and seeking care for chest pain can make a difference in survival.  That's why it is so important that men and women know these symptoms so they can act fast!

Some experience a few clues of blockage within the heart vessels before a heart attack occurs.  An early sign is called angina, which is pain that is felt during exertion, but resolves when you rest. This type of symptom can occur weeks to days before a heart attack occurs.  Therefore, it is equally important to report this symptom to your doctor.

A heart attack occurs when the blood flow to the heart muscle is blocked either by a fatty deposit, cholesterol or other substance.  Without blood flow the muscle becomes damaged and pain ensues. 

According to the Mayo Clinic, the common symptoms of a heart that are experienced include:

  • chest pressure that may spread to the arm or jaw
  • dizziness
  • sweating
  • nausea
  • feeling short of breath
  • feeling anxious
  • heartburn or upper stomach pain
  • clammy skin

Women, persons with diabetes, and the elderly may experience different symptoms.  In fact, some may not have the typical chest pressure or squeezing pain within the chest region.  Instead, they may experience:

  • heartburn
  • shortness of breath
  • feeling faint
  • unusual fatigue that may last several days
  • pain through the upper body such as the shoulders, back or jaw

Heart attack symptoms can come and go.  Whether you have known heart disease or risks (high blood pressure, high cholesterol, smoking, diabetes or you are overweight), or not, you should act quickly if these symptoms occur. 

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/heart-attack/in-depth/heart-attack-symptoms/art-20047744

 

 

 

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